Life Lessons and Reasons Why I Write

I love reading. No, I don’t really but I love learning. I love to absorb as much information about life and human society. I studied psychology and communications in school. When I was younger I read Tuesdays with Morrie and I cried like a baby. There was something about that book that opened my eyes to life– actually, it was that I felt like Morrie went inside my heart and soul and regurgitated what I believed were the true values in life. Unknowingly, I had a soul mate all along (sorry, husband).

And I love to write. I’ve journaled my whole life. I literally have over 10 diaries from the time I was in elementary into my early 30s (yes, starting each entry with “dear diary” and all). I believe in theories, sequences, patterns and the universe kind of all working together in some sort of order. I feel like the longer we are on this earth, the more we start to make out the individual pieces (think life as slowly solving a 5000 piece puzzle) and the more I saw patterns in life (psychology major coming into play?) I wanted to note it, document it and most of all, share and inspire others with it.

I feel like I’m a better communicator with the written word. I am able to lay out my thoughts clearly but not so concisely… Even in my current day job, I am known to be one of the best at summarizing meetings into the written word (nothing to be proud of). When I was young and had much time on my hands, I dreamt of writing my own book and getting published. It has been over 10 years and all I have is a draft of an outline draft (don’t judge… I can imagine what emoji I’d insert here)


So why am I blogging? It’s really two-fold. I’m hoping that I will be able to share and even inspire others with my daily learnings and new findings. And if no one is really reading it, at least I *think* I AM sharing and inspiring others and that gets me fired up to learn and share even more. After all, there’s no selfless altruism right? (ref. friends episode with Phoebe getting stung by the bee) The second is to hopefully become that much closer to writing my book.

I learned recently that having a to-do list of difficult goals is rather daunting and frankly unrealistic. Why do you think we rarely hold onto our New Years’ resolutions? We set ourselves up for failure. (Side note, I always wondered: a lot of people want to lose weight or quit smoking as their NY’s resolution. So, at 12AM do they stop? Or do they consider the new year, the moment they wake up the next day?)

I digress. What I’ve learned is to make small goals, say, walking to the mailbox with the ultimate goal of going to the gym daily. Make that a habit and then build on top of that habit so that you really are at the gym daily. So simple yet so profound. The point is to have daily wins to change your mindset and look back a month, year later and see how far you have come– starting small but winning big…


I walked to the mailbox today.


Maybe it’ll take 10,000 blog posts to finally get my book published. Maybe anthropologists will find my blog and examine the ridiculousness of the 21st century and have a good laugh. Maybe I’ll go down in history with the likes of Isaac Newton and Benjamin Franklin.

If nothing comes out of this blog, other than my family and friends getting an extra glimpse of what’s in my heart and soul–leaving a little impression on their any given weekday… then I can say this blog has been all worth the while.

And I get a win day out of it too.

RETURN POLICY: All returns must be authorized by our operations team. Please email shop@nutritionwithjudy.com to receive an RMA # for return. Returned products must be unopened, free of any markings (in the same condition as it was received), and must be returned within 30 days of invoice date. There will be a 15% restocking fee and shipping charges are non-refundable.

With test kits, once the test is submitted to the lab, sales are final and non-refundable.

Apparel is non-refundable.

The information contained in this site is for informational purposes only. It should not be intended as medical advice, and should not replace your relationship with your healthcare practitioner.